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Steven Yazzie

Steven J. Yazzie (b.1970) Newport Beach, California; lives and works in Phoenix, Arizona. Yazzie is a proud member of the Navajo Nation and a veteran of the Gulf War serving honorably with the United States Marine Corps. He received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Intermedia at Arizona State University and was named the 2014 outstanding graduate for the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. He also studied at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine. Yazzie has been apart of numerous regional, national, and international exhibitions. Most notably he has exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; National Museum of the American Indian, New York, NY; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada; the Museum of Contemporary Native Art, Santa Fe, NM. Throughout Arizona, Yazzie has exhibited at the Heard Museum, Phoenix Art Museum, Arizona State University Art Museum, Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Tucson Museum of Contemporary Art, Tucson Museum of Art, and the Museum of Northern Arizona. Yazzie’s work can be found in a number of public and private collections throughout the country. Yazzie has also received a number of regional and national grants; Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, The National Museum of the American Indian, the Arizona Commission on the Arts, and the Joan Mitchell Award.

Video: Future Face Lounge Preview

Future Face Lounge is a space where participants define their own histories and forecast their futures through face recognition, touchscreens, sensors and projection technology. Can technology help us break free from preconceptions and prejudices about our identities? Steven Yazzie, a student in the Intermedia program at ASU’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, prototypes […]

Future Face Lounge

ASU’s Steven Yazzie confronted carnival-goers with this question: How much do our visible identities − race, gender, ethnicity, social class − affect the way we are conceptualized and treated by others?Does digital media, by splintering physical reality with algorithmic filters and virtual avatars, mean the end of the tyranny of looking and seeing? Or does […]