Multimedia

Digital Tabernacle Photo Stream

During their Digital Tabernacle performance at Emerge 2014: The Carnival of the Future, ministers Marcel O’Gorman and Ron Broglio donned Autographer lifelogging cameras hacked to look like crosses. The cameras automatically snapped still photos throughout the event, demonstrating that although the tabernacle preaches digital abstinence, it is not immune to the sin of irony.

An Autographer lifelogging camera hacked to look like a cross
The cross-cam

Check out the photo stream at the Digital Tabernacle’s Flickr account (ah, there’s the chilly breath of irony again).

To learn more about the Digital Tabernacle, read an article about the performance at Slate’s Future Tense channel.

 

Building a Sand Mandala: An Interview with Geshe Jampa

Tibetan Buddhist monks Geshe Jampa and Ngawang Lama visited Emerge 2014: The Carnival of the Future to create a traditional Sand Mandala at the ASU International Artist Residency Program Gallery at Combine Studios in Downtown Phoenix. View a short documentary film created by ASU’s School of Sustainability about the construction of the Mandala, and learn more about the project at the Emerge 2014 Performances & Magic page.

Video: Joel Garreau, Tain Barzso and Emerge on AZTV’s “Morning Scramble”

Emerge co-director Joel Garreau and technical wizard/drone pilot Tain Barzso visited AZTV’s “Morning Scramble” today to talk about Emerge’s Carnival of the Future on Friday, March 7, and about our theme for 2014, “The Future of Me.”

How do we create a future in which we can thrive? Obviously, a carnival is the best place to find out! Join us on Friday, March 7 and experience The Carnival of the Future.

Video: Future Face Lounge Preview

Future Face Lounge is a space where participants define their own histories and forecast their futures through face recognition, touchscreens, sensors and projection technology. Can technology help us break free from preconceptions and prejudices about our identities? Steven Yazzie, a student in the Intermedia program at ASU’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, prototypes a futuristic carnival of categorization:

Video: Preview of “The Still” Dance Performance

Julie Akerly, an MFA candidate in ASU’s School of Film, Dance and Theatre, presents a preview of “The Still,” a performance that explores what happens when the exchange of knowledge, ideas, words, and emotions in social media is transformed into live interactions. What does it look like when our desires for privacy and anonymity collide with our appetite to be noticed and to maintain and develop our relationships?

The Machine Stops Without You

Designed to create a moiré pattern effect, ASU MFA student Thad Trubakoff’s “Sirens” is a kinetic wall sculpture that reinvents the kaleidoscope by generating intense visual and audial effects as it spins. Microcontrollers, sensors and motors enable the system to initiate and “sing a visual song,” in the artist’s words, when human viewers are present. To see the latest photo and video documentation of Thad’s work in progress, visit http://www.thadt.com/sirens-progress/.

 

Scoring on Facebook: How To Play the Social Networking Game

from: Slate.com

Last week, Future Tense took part in Emerge, a conference at Arizona State University that is dedicated to designing the kind of future we want to live in. (ASU is a partner with Slate and the New America Foundation in Future Tense.) As part of Emerge, participants in assorted workshops created videos, journals, plays, and more to imagine different parts of our future. Continue reading